Advertisement

Archives for February 2011

What did the Order‘s brothers eat in the Klaipėda castle? (The Historical and zooarchaeological data)

What did the Order‘s brothers eat in the Klaipėda castle?  (The Historical and zooarchaeological data) By Vladas Žulkus and Linas Daugnora Archaeologica Baltica, Vol.12 (2009) Abstract: Built in 1252 by the Livonian Order and later passed over to the Teutonic Order, the Klaipėda castle (German – Memelburg) was the northernmost castle of the Order in […]

Manufacturing Techniques of Belt and Harness Fittings of the 10th Century AD

The present study includes approximately 900 items of belt and horse harness fittings. They have been found on the Upper Dnieper, Smolensk region, the site of the Gnezdovo settlement and cemetery dating from the end of 9th to the beginning of 11th century.

Saracen Archers in Southern Italy

The Normans, soon after the conquest of Sicily was complete, began using Sicilian Saracen mounted and foot archers as auxiliary troops: in 1076 they were included in the Guiscard army at the seizure of Salerno

Byzantine Textiles

Byzantine Textiles By Roger Gilman and Jane Bowler Gilman Art and Archeology, Vol. 13 (1922) Introduction: Silks and spices – the magic of the East is in the words, for these two products were more sought after than any other goods of the caravan trade. Silk in all probability originated in China but was known […]

Vikings in Ireland and Scotland in the Ninth Century

Vikings in Ireland and Scotland in the Ninth Century By Donnchadh Ó Corráin Peritia Vol.12 (1998) Abstract: This study attempts to provide a new framework for ninth-century Irish and Scottish history. Viking Scotland, known as Lothlend, Laithlinn, Lochlainn and comprising the Northern and Western Isles and parts of the mainland, especially Caithness, Sutherland and Inverness, […]

The Historical Setting of Chaucer’s Book of the Duchess

Criticism of Chaucer’s Book of the Duchess, the first major work of a young man who was to become England’s most famous poet, has sometimes neglected not only the immediate historical setting of the poem and the most probable circumstances of its first publication, but also the mores of its audience.

The Cadaver Synod: Strangest Trial in History

One thousand, one hundred and four years ago, a criminal trial took place in Italy, a trial so macabre, so gruesome, so frightful, that it easily qualifies as the strangest and most terrible trial in human in human history.

SIMONE MARTINI’S ST. LOUIS OF TOULOUSE AND ITS CULTURAL CONTEXT

SIMONE MARTINI’S ST. LOUIS OF TOULOUSE AND ITS CULTURAL CONTEXT Scotti, Suzette Denise MA Thesis, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, August (2009) Abstract This thesis provides a cultural and historical context for Simone Martini’s painting, St. Louis of Toulouse Crowning Robert of Naples, a landmark of Early Renaissance Sienese art. It offers a detailed […]

Institutionalized Sufism and Non-Institutionalized Sufism: A Reconsideration of the Groups of Sufi Saints of the Non-Ṭarīqa Type as Viewed through the Historical Documents of Medieval Maghreb

Institutionalized Sufism and Non-Institutionalized Sufism: A Reconsideration of the Groups of Sufi Saints of the Non-Ṭarīqa Type as Viewed through the Historical Documents of Medieval Maghreb Masatoshi, KISAICHI Kyoto Bulletin of Islamic Area Studies, 2-1 (2008) Abstract Perhaps the most important innovation in the 12th and 13th century Islamic world was the institutionalization of Sufism. During the years 1150 […]

Anglo-Saxon Magico-Medicine

A mass of folly and credulity?

Three Views of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster

Three Views of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster Rocke, Sean Published Online ~ Course: British Studies (ID 382), Harlaxton College, Spring (2011) Abstract John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, was a rich, powerful, and influential nobleman in the 14th century. As the son, uncle, and father of kings, Gaunt was never far from central authority. For […]

Source materials for fishing in Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages

Instead of searching for ancient parallels to the fishery statistics, tithe-books and tax records of the early modern periods – a waste of time, since such records are not preserved and probably never existed – we should look at all possible approaches to the problem and all possible sources.

The Middle Ages on the block: animals, Guilds and meat in the medieval period

Understanding the place of butchery in the medieval period requires a more in depth appraisal of the place of animals in medieval English culture. Fortunately, this period is perhaps one of the most interesting in terms of the lines of information available for this assessment. The rich historical evidence has led to research detailing the manufacture and uses of tools; the animals acquired and eaten in a number of different social contexts and accounts relating to the organisation of butchery.

medievalverse magazine
WordPress Security