Advertisement

Decline and decadence in Iraq and Syria after the age of Avicenna? : ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baghdādī (1162–1231) between myth and history

Decline and decadence in Iraq and Syria after the age of Avicenna? : ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baghdādī (1162–1231) between myth and history

By Nanne Pieter George Joosse and Peter E. Pormann

Bulletin of the History of Medicine, Vol.84:1 (2010)

Abstract: ‘Abd al-Laṭīf al-Baghdādī’s (d. 1231) work Book of the Two Pieces of Advice (Kitāb al Nasīḥatayn) challenges the idea that Islamic medicine declined after the twelfth century AD. Moreover, it offers some interesting insights into the social history of medicine. ‘Abd al-Laṭīf advocated using the framework of Greek medical epistemology to criticize the rationalist physicians of his day; he argued that female and itinerant practitioners, relying on experience, were superior to some rationalists. He lambasted contemporaneous medical education because it put too much faith in a restricted number of textbooks such as the Canon by Ibn Sīnā (Avicenna, d. 1037) or imperfect abridgments.

Click here to read this article from the University of Warwick

Sign up to get a Weekly Email from Medievalists.net

* indicates required

medievalverse magazine