Advertisement

Arguments, Texts, and Contexts: Anselm’s Argument and the Friars

Arguments, Texts, and Contexts: Anselm’s Argument and the Friars

Matthews, Scott

Medieval Philosophy and Theology 8 (1999)

Abstract

The contrast between the reception of Anselm’s Proslogion in the work of Bonaventure and in the work of Thomas Aquinas is often held up as a classic example of their competing intellectual assumptions. Some have located the intellectual prerequisites for the acceptance or rejection of Anselm’s argument in the prior acceptance of univocal or analogical accounts of being. P. A. Daniels argued that the prerequisites for Bonaventure’s acceptance of the argument were not his “ontological” mode of thought, or a doctrine of the innate idea of God within the soul, but in his acceptance of examplar causality. Half a century later, Jean Chattillon, following Étienne Gilson, affirmed the more common view of the issue, that the acceptance or rejection of Anselm’s argument among the first scholastics of the thirteenth century depended upon their allegiance to Augustinian or Aristotelian traditions.

Click here to read this article from Medieval Philosophy and Theology

Sign up to get a Weekly Email from Medievalists.net

* indicates required

medievalverse magazine