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Excavations at Caherconnell Cashel, the Burren, Co. Clare: implications for cashel chronology and Gaelic settlement

Excavations at Caherconnell Cashel, the Burren, Co. Clare: implications for cashel chronology and Gaelic settlement

By Michelle Comber and Graham Hull

Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy Vol. 110C (2010)

Abstract: Caherconnell Cashel is one of several hundred stone ring-forts distributed across the Burren, Co. Clare. Unlike the majority of these smaller sites, Caherconnell measures over 40m in diameter, and is enclosed by 3m-high walls in a good state of preservation. The cashel’s location along a natural routeway, evidence for continued use of the immediate area for settlement over a long period, and excavated remains all point to the elevated status of this site. A series of radiocarbon dates place activity at Caherconnell between the tenth and early seventeenth centuries AD, thereby providing new evidence for the dating of such cashels, continuity of occupation and some indication of how wealthy Gaelic families lived in the medieval period.

Click here to read/download this article (PDF file)

See also: North Clare dig unravels medieval mystery

One of the mysteries of medieval Ireland is on the verge of being solved thanks to the latest in a series of excavations to take place at Caherconnell Stone Fort in Carron. Early results from a dig which concluded this week-end indicate that important local families continued to live in cashel type dwellings in Clare, long after they became unfashionable in other parts of the country…read the full article from The Clare People

See also: Caherconnell Archaeological Field School

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