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Archives for August 2010

A Layered Landscape: How the Family Sagas Mapped Medieval Iceland

In this paper I discuss three ways in which the family sagas inscribed cognitive maps over Iceland: firstly, sagas explain how places received their names through the people who lived and acted there; secondly, saga narratives traversing the named landscape act to imprint it further with human meaning; and finally, Íslendingasögur refer us to physical evidence of saga action in the landscape, asserting it can ‘still be seen today’.

Muzeum Zamkowe w Malborku

Muzeum Zamkowe w Malborku The castle was built by the Teutonic Order, they named it Marienburg, “Mary’s Castle”. The town which grew around it was also named Marienburg, and since 1945 it is known as Malbork. The castle is a classic example of a medieval fortress.   It is one of two World Heritage Sites in […]

The expansion of a European feudal monarchy during the 13th Century: the Catalan-Aragonese Crown and the consequences of the conquest of the kingdoms of Majorca and Valencia

The expansion of a European feudal monarchy during the 13th Century: the Catalan-Aragonese Crown and the consequences of the conquest of the kingdoms of Majorca and Valencia By Enric Guinot Catalan Historical Review, Vol.2:2 (2009) Abstract: In the middle of the 13th century the Crown of Aragon conquered by military means the Muslim Mediterranean Coast […]

Medieval England to be featured in two BBC shows

Television viewers in the United Kingdom will have the chance to watch two new history programmes that feature medieval England. The BBC will start airing a new six-part series, Churches: How to Read Them, on September 1st on BBC Four. Presented by author Richard Taylor, it will examine how imagery, symbols and architecture of English parish […]

William Wallace’s Invasion of Northern England in 1297

In the winter of 1297 William Wallace, fresh from his victory over the English at Stirling Bridge, presided over a ferocious and prolonged devastation of northern England.

Excavations at Caherconnell Cashel, the Burren, Co. Clare: implications for cashel chronology and Gaelic settlement

Excavations at Caherconnell Cashel, the Burren, Co. Clare: implications for cashel chronology and Gaelic settlement By Michelle Comber and Graham Hull Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy Vol. 110C (2010) Abstract: Caherconnell Cashel is one of several hundred stone ring-forts distributed across the Burren, Co. Clare. Unlike the majority of these smaller sites, Caherconnell measures […]

Katedra Oliwska – Gdańsk

Katedra Oliwa is located in the city of Gdańsk, in the Oliwa district of the city. On July 2, 1186, Sambor I Gdański, Prince of Pomerania, founded a Cistercian Monastery and the history of the Cathedral began. The cathedral is 17.7m high, 19m wide and 107m long which making it the longest Cistercian church in […]

Interview with Rafe de Crespigny

Rafe de Crespigny is Professor Emeritus at the Australian National University. He is considered to be one of the most important historians on early medieval China, focusing on the late second and third centuries, when the Han Dynasty collapsed and was replaced by the Three Kingdoms. Professor de Crespigny has written numerous books and articles […]

The Society for the Public Understanding of the Middle Ages

The society aims to focus on how the general public views the Middle Ages through various media, an to interact with authors, filmakers, festival organizers, etc, who help shape the image of medieval society in the contemporary world.

Interview with author Jayden Woods – August 29, 2010

Last week, we reviewed a book entitled “Eadric the Grasper: Sons of Mercia Vol. I”.  I had the pleasure of interviewing author Jayden Woods about her upcoming book, background, and future novels. Jayden graduated from the University of Southern California’s Writing for Screen and Television program and lived Los Angeles for five years before deciding […]

Medieval Festival at Herstmonceux Castle takes place this weekend

The Medieval Festival at Herstmonceux Castle, which is taking place this weekend in the English county of East Sussex, is expected to draw its biggest-ever attendance this year. Last year over 30,000 visitors flocked through the gates at the three-day Festival, already the largest of its kind in Northern Europe. This year, the Festival has […]

Servant to England: The Biography of Adam Marsh (de Marisco)

Servant to England: The Biography of Adam Marsh (de Marisco) By Jason A.S. Drake Honors BA Thesis, College of William and Mary, 2008 Introduction: The friend and confidante of Robert Grosseteste, the teacher of such academic luminaries as Thomas of York and Roger Bacon, and the spiritual advisor and counselor to great magnates such as […]

Bielsko-Biała – Katedra św. Mikołaja/Zamek książąt Sułkowskich

Bielsko-Biała is a city in southern Poland located 1 hour south of Katowice and approximately 1 and 1/2 hours south-west of Kraków. Bielsko-Biała is composed of two former cities on opposite banks of the Biała River, Bielsko and Biała. Bielsko-Biała is one of the most important cities of the Beskidy region. A fortified settlement was […]

Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! Voices from a Medieval Village

Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! Voices from a Medieval Village By Laura Amy Schlitz Candlewick Press, 2007 ISBN: 978-0-7636-1578-9 Maidens, monks, and millers’ sons — in these pages, readers will meet them all. There’s Hugo, the lord’s nephew, forced to prove his manhood by hunting a wild boar; sharp-tongued Nelly, who supports her family by selling […]

Human sacrifice in medieval Irish literature

In this survey, early Irish examples of human sacrifice are classified in four types.

Logic and the condemnations of 1277

Logic and the condemnations of 1277 By Sara L. Uckelman Journal of Philosophical Logic 39, no. 2 (2010) Abstract: The struggle to delineate the relationship between theology and logic flourished in the thirteenth century and culminated in two condemnations in early 1277, one in Paris and the other in Oxford. To see how much and […]

Medieval Fantasy as Performance: The Society for Creative Anachronism and the Current Middle Ages

Medieval Fantasy as Performance: The Society for Creative Anachronism and the Current Middle Ages By Michael A. Cramer Scarecrow Press, 2009 ISBN: 978-0-8108-6995-0 In this book, Michael Cramer views the Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA), an organization that studies and recreates the middle ages, as a case study for a growing fascination with medieval fantasy […]

‘Castles of Communities’: medieval town defences in England; Wales and Gascony

This paper introduces the findings of a research project exploring the phenomenon of town defences in the later medieval period.

Medieval Hebrew Manuscripts on display at The Met

Two important medieval Hebrew manuscripts—a Mishneh Torah made between 1300 and 1400 in Germany and an illuminated leaf from a prayer book made in Austria around 1360—are on display in New York City at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Cloisters, respectively, in conjunction with the Jewish High Holy Days this fall. The Cloisters […]

Stubbs, Steel, and Richard II as Insane: The Origin and Evolution of an English Historiographical Myth

‘Richard II had become dangerous, perhaps dangerously mad. His final breakdown is . . . tragic…’

Midwives and Medical Texts: Women’s Healing Practices in the Crown of Aragón, 1300-1600

Throughout the kingdom of Aragón, women who performed healing actions were only periodically titled midwives and very rarely called doctors. They were even more infrequently licensed or counted in censuses in such a way that we can reliably estimate the number of female healers.

The Golden Summary of Cinggis Qayan

The Golden Summary of Cinggis Qayan By Leland Liu Rogers Harrassowitz Verlag, 2009 ISBN: 978-3-447-06074-5 The Golden Summary of Cinggis Qayan (Cinggis Qayan-u Altan Tobci) is the earliest post-Mongol Empire period compilation of legends of the Genghis Khan mythos known to date. These stories are the original legends from which many later Genghis Khan Chronicles were […]

Fact or folklore: the Viking attack on London Bridge

One of the most dramatic events in London’s history is the Viking attack, led by Óláfr (or Olaf) Haraldsson on London Bridge.

Religious women and their communities in late medieval Scotland

Religious women and their communities in late medieval Scotland By Kimberly Ann Curran PhD Dissertation, University of Glasgow, 2005 Abstract: The traditional view of historians is that Scottish female religious establishments were not worthy of study due to the ‘scanty’ sources available for these women, by these women or their convents. This study will challenge […]

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