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Archives for July 2010

‘You cannot sell liberty for all the gold there is’: promoting good governance in early Renaissance Florence

You cannot sell liberty for all the gold there is: promoting good governance in early Renaissance Florence By Peter Howard Renaissance Studies, Vol.24:2 (2010) Abstract: During the Medicean ascendancy in Renaissance Florence, the city’s Dominican Archbishop, Sant’ Antonino Pierozzi, used the power of the pulpit to ensure that deeds undertaken by citizens were motivated not […]

Danzig and Poland in History

Danzig and Poland in History By Stanislaw Kutrzeba Baltic and Scandinavian Countries, Vol.4 (1938) Introduction: Danzig’s (Gdansk’s) relations with Poland have described a chequered course since the city first received historical mention in the Life of St.Adalbert in 997. The interwoven fortunes of Danzig and Poland are a fruitful theme, and it will be of […]

Yorkshire Museum reopens on August 1st

The Yorkshire Museum reopens on August 1st, 2010 following a nine month, £2 million refurbishment project. Five new galleries will showcase some of Britain’s finest archaeological and natural treasures, in brand new interactive displays. The Yorkshire Museum hopes that the extensive changes will make it must-see destination in a tour around the English city of […]

Recent Trends in the Study of the Middle Ages

Recent Trends in the Study of the Middle Ages By Giles Constable Annual of Medieval Studies at CEU, vol. 15 (2009) Introduction: My talk this afternoon looks both backwards and forwards: backwards to the tradition of medieval studies and the influence of new approaches and methodologies in the second half of the twentieth century – […]

Lost medieval bibles found at Hill Museum & Manuscript Library

Complete microfilms of two early medieval Spanish Bibles dating from the 9th and 10th century that were damaged or destroyed during the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) have been found in the microfilm vault of the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML), in Minnesota. Before the discovery of the microfilms, scholars thought the two Bibles, known […]

L’Anse aux Meadows site celebrates 50 years since discovery

Last week the government of Canada marked the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the Viking remains at the L’Anse aux Meadows in Newfoundland. The national historic and World Heritage site was discovered by Helge and Anne Stine Instad, and their guide, local fisherman George Decker, in 1960. Celebrations were held on July 21st at […]

The Baltic and the Black Sea in Medieval Trade

The Baltic and the Black Sea in Medieval Trade By Marian Malowist Baltic and Scandinavian Countries, Vol.3 (1937) Introduction: The object of this paper is to give a short outline of the history of Black Sea and Baltic trade during the Middle Ages, and to examine the reciprocal action of these two important historical phenomena. […]

Women workers could be found on the medieval construction site, study finds

According to a recently published study, women could be found working on construction sites, if only occasionally, including in specialized roles such as carpenters and masons. The research is found in the article, “Appropriate to Her Sex?” Women’s Participation on the Construction Site in Medieval and Early Modern Europe,” by Shelley E. Roff. She surveyed […]

Holy Warriors: A Modern History of the Crusades

Holy Warriors: A Modern History of the Crusades By Jonathan Phillips Bodley Head, 2009 ISBN: 97802240799372 Synopsis: In his remarkable book, Jonathan Phillips explores the conflict of ideas, beliefs and cultures and shows both the contradictions and diversity of holy war. He draws on contemporary writings – on chronicles, songs, sermons, travel diaries and peace […]

Forging Links with the Past: the twelfth-century reconstruction of Anglo-Saxon Peterborough

This thesis is a study of four early twelfth-century forgeries, comprising a house-history, two charters and a papal bull and how they were used by the monks of Peterborough to reconstruct their monastery’s pre-Conquest past.

A Contribution to the History of the Conversion of Lithuania

A Contribution to the History of the Conversion of Lithuania By Zenonas Ivinskis Baltic and Scandinavian Countries, Vol.5 (1939) Introduction: The Lithuanians became converted to Christianity only five hundred and fifty years ago, and their final adoption of it constitutes one of the most serious problems of Lithuanian history in the fourteenth century. It had […]

The Representation of Chivalry in The Knight’s Tale

The Representation of Chivalry in The Knight’s Tale By Jordi Sánchez Martí Revista Alicantina de Estudios Ingleses, Vol.13 (2000) Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to determine to what exíent the contemporaneous state of chivalry has influenced Chaucer’s Knight in his literary endeavor. First I analyze the Knight’s personality, which evinces his militant and […]

Tolerance’s End: Religious Minorities, Philosophers, Free-Thinkers and the Rise of Fundamentalism in 12th and 13th Century Islamic Spain

Tolerance’s End: Religious Minorities, Philosophers, Free-Thinkers and the Rise of Fundamentalism in 12th and 13th Century Islamic Spain Lecture by Lourdes Maria Alvarez, Acting Director of Medieval and Byzantine Studies at the Catholic University of America Given on April 23, 2009 at the Catholic University of America Explorations (and celebrations) of the so-called convivencia between […]

Take Writing: News, Information, and Documentary Culture in Late Medieval England

This dissertation analyzes late medieval English texts in order to understand how they respond to the anxieties of a society experiencing the growing passion for news and the development of documentary culture.

An Introduction to Byzantine Monasticism

An Introduction to Byzantine Monasticism By Alice-Mary Talbot Illinois Classical Studies, Vol.12:2 (1987) Introduction: The institution of monasticism was one of the most important characteristics of Byzantine society, and touched the life of virtually every imperial subject in many ways. First of all, a substantial number of Byzantine men and women took monastic vows: some […]

Mehmed the Conqueror and the Equestrian Statue of the Augustaion

Mehmed the Conqueror and the Equestrian Statue of the Augustaion By J. Raby Illinois Classical Studies, Vol. 12:2 (1987) Introduction: One of the landmarks of Constantinople was the colossal equestrian statue which stood on top of a hundred-foot-high column outside Hagia Sophia. Known as the Augustaion from the square in which it stood, the bronze […]

Byzantium’s Role in the Formation of Early Medieval Civilization: Approaches and Problems

Byzantium’s Role in the Formation of Early Medieval Civilization: Approaches and Problems By Michael McCormick Illinois Classical Studies, Vol.12:2 (1987) Introduction: Until recently, Europe from the collapse of Roman power in the fifth century to the Carolingian achievement in the ninth—the early Middle Ages—has been the poor step-child of modem historical research. The reasons are […]

Winthrop University begins offering Medieval Studies minor

Undergraduate students attending Winthrop University in South Carolina can now study for a new minor program: medieval studies.  Approved in April 2009, the 18-hour interdisciplinary minor offers three dozen courses – both existing and newly created – that are particularly useful to students studying fields such as history; English; political science; philosophy and religious studies; […]

Traveling Around the Empire: Iberian Voyages, the Sphere, and the Atlantic Origins of the Scientific Revolution

Traveling Around the Empire: Iberian Voyages, the Sphere, and the Atlantic Origins of the Scientific Revolution By Lino Camprubí Eä – Journal of Medical Humanities & Social Studies of Science and Technology, Vol.1:2 (2009) Abstract: This paper aims at illuminating the links between spherical geography, Catholic empire and the Atlantic origins of the scientific revolution. Boldly […]

Professor Peter Mack appointed Director of Warburg Institute

Peter Mack, Professor of English at the University Warwick, has been appointed as the new Director of the Warburg Institute at the University of London. He will begins his appointment on October 1, 2010, overseeing one of the most important academic institutions for the study of the influence of classical antiquity on all aspects of […]

The Pillars of the Earth – the Amplified Edition

The Amplified Edition of Ken Follett’s international bestselling novel The Pillars of the Earth has been released by Penguin Books and Starz. It combines the novel with new content from the upcoming mini-series. This electronic edition is available for the iPad, iPhone and iPod in the United States. Beyond just offering an e-version of the […]

Salas y Quiroga’s Anglo-Saxon England: a Psychological and Sociological Portrait of Power

Salas y Quiroga’s Anglo-Saxon England: a Psychological and Sociological Portrait of Power By Paloma Tejada Caller ATLANTIS. Journal of the Spanish Association of Anglo-American Studies, Vol.31.1 (2009) Abstract: The aim of this paper is ultimately to contribute new insights from current explorations of Englishness in Spain. More specifically, a selected narrative written by Jacinto Salas […]

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