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Archives for May 2010

The Social Status of Women in Latvia in the 7th-13th Centuries, in the Light of Palaeodemographic Data

This paper is intended as a contribution to the understanding of women’s social role and living conditions in the Iron Age society in Latvia.

What’s the point of studying medieval literature?

Professor Thorlac Turville-Petre of the University of Nottingham discussing his study of literature from the Middle Ages.

The Decline of the Aristocracy in Eleventh and Twelfth Century Sardinia

Beginning in the eleventh century, Pisa and Genoa — both as communes and in the persons of individual Pisans and Genovese, — followed by Catalans and Aragonese, exhibited an increasing, and increasingly covetous, interest in Sardinia and (especially) its resources; and, already during the twelfth century, the island had fallen largely under continental domination.

Confraternities, Memoria, and Law in Late Medieval Italy

To view medieval brotherhoods or confraternities as associations of laymen or clerics with predominantly religious functions almost automatically leads to the conclusion that fraternity and memoria have much in common.

Early childhood stress and adult age mortality – A study of dental enamel hypoplasia in the medieval Danish village of Tirup

Early childhood stress and adult age mortality – A study of dental enamel hypoplasia in the medieval Danish village of Tirup By Jesper L. Boldsen American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Volume 132:1 (2007) Abstract: This study explores how linear enamel hypoplasia (LEH) affects mortality in the village of Tirup (A.D. 1150-1350), Denmark. Data consist of […]

Castle for Sale in Italy: Castle of Cravanzana

The Castle of Cravanzana was originally built in the twelfth-century and is located in the village of Cravanzana in the Langhe region of Piedmont, Italy.

The Precognition of Crime: Treason in Medieval England and Terrorism in Twenty-first Century America

The Knight of the Two Swords in Thomas Malory’s Morte Darthur (1485) tells a story of an invisible knight who without provocation kills other knights.

Ethnicity, Identity, and Difference: The Origins of Lay People in the Carolingian Empire

Ethnicity, Identity, and Difference: The Origins of Lay People in the Carolingian Empire Session: Carolingian Studies: Secular Culture II By Helmut Reimitz, Princeton University This paper discussed Frankish collective identity in the early Middle Ages. The Carolingian period was an important period for the process of promoting Frankish names and identity. Prayers for the kingdom […]

Dealing with the Past and Planning for the Future: Contested Memories, Conflicted Loyalties, and the Partition and Donation of the Duchy of Pomerania

Dealing with the Past and Planning for the Future: Contested Memories, Conflicted Loyalties, and the Partition and Donation of the Duchy of Pomerania Session: Eastern Europe in the Middle Ages By Paul Milliman, University of Arizona This paper deals with the Pomeranian Prince, Mściwój II, Poland and the duchy of Pomerania. Mściwój needed someone to […]

Review: Robin Hood

Review: Robin Hood Warning: Spoilers Sandra: Peter and I saw Robin Hood on the opening weekend and both of us were pleasantly surprised by this movie. It was directed by Ridley Scott, of Alien, Blade Runner, Kingdom of Heaven, and Gladiator fame. The movie stars Russell Crowe as Robin Hood and Cate Blanchett as Maid […]

Employment on a Northern English Farm, 1370-1409

Professor Britnell spoke about the manorial accounts from a small farm in Durham called Houghall, which belonged to Durham Priory.

Art and Identity in an Amulet Roll from Fourteenth-Century Trebizond

Art and Identity in an Amulet Roll from Fourteenth-Century Trebizond By Glenn Peers Church History and Religious Culture, Vol.89:1-3 (2009) Abstract: This article examines a unique survival from the Middle Ages: an amulet roll, now divided between libraries in New York City and Chicago, which now measures approximately 5 m in width and 8–9 cm […]

The Evolving Representation of the Early Islamic Empire and Its Religion on Coin Imagery

The Evolving Representation of the Early Islamic Empire and Its Religion on Coin Imagery By Stefan Heidemann The Qur’an in Context, edited by Angelika Neuwirth, Nicolai Sinai and Michael Marx (Brill, 2010) Introduction: How did the theology of Islam and its idea of an empire evolve, based on the Hellenistic Romano-Iranian foundation, in the face […]

The Ladies of Ely

The ‘sisters’ of Ely were among the most venerated saints of Anglo-Saxon England, regularly rivalling even the Canterbury cults in the number and value of donations received from supplicants

Human skeletal remains from the Osaka castle site in Japan: metrics and weapon injuries

Human skeletal remains from the Osaka castle site in Japan: metrics and weapon injuries By Tomohito Nagaoka and Mikko Abe Anthropological Science, Vol.115 (2007) Abstract: The purpose of this study is to report on the results of the observations of newly excavated human skeletons from the Osaka castle site and to explore the metric features […]

The Cult of ‘Maria Regina’ in Early Medieval Rome

The Cult of ‘Maria Regina’ in Early Medieval Rome By John Osborne Paper given at the Norwegian Institute in Rome (2004) Introduction: Few cities in the Christian world can boast such a deep connection to the cult of Mary as can the city of Rome, and none can claim a longer history of depicting her […]

Icon: A Word with Many Meanings

Helen Evans describes the many different kinds of icons that populated the Byzantine world, delving into the Met’s incredible collection of these venerable images.

Eirene Doukaina, Byzantine empress, A.D. 1067-1133

Eirene Doukaina, Byzantine empress, A.D. 1067-1133 By Elizabeth C. Lundy Master’s Thesis, University of Ottawa, 1988 Abstract: Eirene Doukaina was born in Constantinople in the year 1067 into the wealthy aristocratic family of the Doukai. she was destined to become the wife of Alexios Komnenos, emperor of Byzantium from 1081 to 1118, and her descendants […]

Three Anglo-Saxon prose passages: A translation and commentary

Our thesis set out to translate, with relevant commentary, the three prose passages found in the MS. Cotton Vitellius A. xv.

Kalamazoo 2010 – Summary and Thoughts….

The 45th installment of the International Congress of Medieval Studies was another highly successful affair, bringing in over 3000 scholars and delivering hundreds of papers. Medievalists.net was on hand to listen to the papers and enjoy the conference. Here is our personal thoughts about the congress: Sandra: As always, I had a great time in […]

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