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Archives for March 2010

Popular Belief and the Image of the Beardless Christ

No one knows what Jesus of Nazareth looked like. Nevertheless, over the course of time , the Western world gave him a physiology that became familiar to every Christian – a slender solemn face with curly dark hair and a small beard.

Brethren Behaving Badly: A Deviant Approach to Medieval Antifraternalism

Brethren Behaving Badly: A Deviant Approach to Medieval Antifraternalism By Guy Geltner Speculum, Vol.85:1 (2010) Introduction: Clizia, the titular protagonist of Machiavelli’s play, was trapped between her master’s sexual advances and her mistress’s attempt to avoid scandal. For their part, and with no arbiter in sight, husband and wife remained at strategic loggerheads as to […]

Medieval Microcredit? Pledging and Rural Credit in England During the Middle Ages

How did credit markets emerged in medieval England? This is the puzzle addressed in this paper.

If I Had Stayed in Salonika – The Holocaust and its Precursors in Sephardic History and Literature

“If I Had Stayed in Salonika” (Si io stava en Salanik): The Holocaust and its Precursors in Sephardic History and Literature Lecture by Dr. Louise Mirrer Given at CUNY – Queensborough Community College, on October 23, 2002 Dr. Mirrer has published widely on language, literature, medieval studies, and womens studies. Her most recent book is […]

An Introduction to the Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England Project

An Introduction to the Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England Project By David A. E. Pelteret Paper presented at University College London (2002) Introduction: The Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England is a five-year AHRB-sponsored project that will provide in database form a biographical register of all identifiable Anglo- Saxons from the period 597 to 1042. The project, which […]

Crucifixion and Conversion: King Henry III and the Jews in 1255

The supposed crucifixion in 1255 of a little Christian boy by the Jews of Lincoln, in macabre parody of the crucifixion of Christ, was for Jews and Christians alike, although for very different reasons, one of the most shocking events in the reign of King Henry III.

The Burgundian Court and the Urban milieu as patrons in 15th century Bruges

The Burgundian Court and the Urban milieu as patrons in 15th century Bruges By W.P. Blockmans Economic History and the Arts, edited by M. North (Cologne, 1996) Introduction: The relationship between art and society belongs to the most ferociously debated issues in history. We should not be too surprised about the difficulty of bridging the […]

Books, scribes and sequences in medieval Norway

The study of manuscript fragments is of immense importance in Norway to increase our knowledge of medieval book and scribal culture, as so little material is transmitted in the form of complete codices.

Interview with Guy Gavriel Kay

Medievalists.net interviews Guy Gavriel Kay, the highly successful historical fiction and fantasy author, about his latest novel Under Heaven and his career as a writer. Click here for more details about Under Heaven Click here to go to our profile of Guy Gavriel Kay

Donatello’s decapitations and the rhetoric of beheading in Medicean Florence

Donatello’s bronze sculptures of Judith and David continue to elude a definitive art-historical interpretation despite their high visibility within the field of Renaissance studies.

Romancing Islam: Reclaiming Christian Unity in the Middle English Romances of Otuel and Ferumbras

Romancing Islam: Reclaiming Christian Unity in the Middle English Romances of Otuel and Ferumbras By Andrew W. Klein Master’s Thesis, University of Saskatchewan, 2009 Abstract: This study focuses on the peculiar success that a number of Middle English romances achieved in fourteenth-century England. The romances, Otuel a Knight, Otuel and Roland, Duke Rowland and Sir Otuell […]

The gentil example : thematic parallels in Froissart’s Chroniques and Chaucer’s Franklin’s tale

I intend to go beyond the biographical and source study that has dominated discussion on Chaucer and Froissart and embark on a project of tracing thematic parallels in two of their works, specifically focusing on the issue that I find most obvious between them: the desire to create and record literary discussions of ethical behaviour.

We Rule – iPhone game

This new game for iPhone users is a medieval version of the popular Farmville game. Developed by Newtoy and ngmoco, the game can be freely downloaded from the Apple App Store. Players can create their very own whimsical kingdom full of castles, farms and, of course, loyal citizens. Players will raise crops, collect taxes and […]

The Viking Mind, or In Pursuit of the Viking

The Viking Mind, or In Pursuit of the Viking By Anthony Faulkes Saga Book of the Viking Society, Vol.31 (2007) Introduction: Historians and archaeologists over the last two generations have changed our perceptions of the Viking Age and have drawn people’s attention to less destructive and more creative activities than rape and pillage, such as […]

Relations between Portugal and Castile in the Late Middle Ages – 13th-16th centuries

Relations between Portugal and Castile in the Late Middle Ages – 13th-16th centuries By Vicente Ángel Álvarez Palenzuela e-Journal of Portuguese History, Vol.1:1 (2003) Abstract: A study of the intense diplomatic relations maintained between the Portuguese and Leonese, afterwards Castilian-Leonese, monarchies throughout the Middle Ages. They were dotted with a series of agreements relating to […]

The Portuguese Medieval Parliament: Are We Asking the Right Questions?

The Portuguese Medieval Parliament:  Are We Asking the Right Questions? By Luís Miguel Duarte e-Journal of Portuguese History, Vol.1:2 (2003) Abstract: It had traditionally been thought that the history of the Portuguese mediaeval parliament was exhausted from the point of view of available information; almost all approaches had studied the Cortes from a legal angle. […]

The Post-Resurrection Appearances of Christ: The case of the Chairete or ‘All Hail’

The Chairete is a unique event described by Matthew. According to the Evangelist, two women, namely Mary Magdalene and the other Mary (the mother of Jacob and Joses) discovered Christ’s empty tomb and when they saw the resurrected Christ, he hailed them.

Reconstructing the Image of an Empress in Middle Byzantine Constantinople: Gender in Byzantium, Psellos’ Empress Zoe and the Chapel of Christ Antiphonites

Reconstructing the Image of an Empress in Middle Byzantine Constantinople: Gender in Byzantium, Psellos’ Empress Zoe and the Chapel of Christ Antiphonites By Giulia Zulian Rosetta: Papers of the Institute of Archaeology and Antiquity, Issue 2 (2007) Abstract: In Byzantium the choice of a specific site for imperial patronage represented a means for the emperor […]

Bloody Slaughter: Ritual Decapitation and Display At the Viking Settlement of Hofstaðir, Iceland

This article attempts an interpretation of an unusual assemblage of cattle skulls recovered from recent excavations at the Viking Age monumental hall of Hofstaðir in Iceland.

The historic repair and reuse of Byzantine wooden bookboards in the manuscript collection of the monastery of St Catherine, Sinai

The historic repair and reuse of Byzantine wooden bookboards in the manuscript collection of the monastery of St Catherine, Sinai By Andrew Honey and Athanasios Velios Holding it all together: ancient and modern approaches to joining, repair and consolidation, ed. J. Ambers (London: Archetype Publications in association with The British Museum, 2009) Abstract: This paper […]

Prayer Bead Production and use in Medieval England

The word ‘bead’ derives from the Old English word ‘ebed’, originally meaning to pray or request, and was used to describe groups of beads which were loosely strung together.

Plundering the Territories in the Manner of the Heathens: Identifying Viking Age Battlefields in Britain

Plundering the Territories in the Manner of the Heathens: Identifying Viking Age Battlefields in Britain By Benjamin Raffield Rosetta: Papers of the Institute of Archaeology and Antiquity, Issue 7 (2009) Introduction: ‘Battle’ is a word often associated with the Viking Age in England and there are numerous references in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles to the conflict that […]

Bernard of Clairvaux and the Knights Templar: The New Knighthood as a Solution to Violence in Christianity

Using writings from Bernard of Clairvaux and other religious and secular writers of the time, this thesis will examine how the crusades were originally meant to redeem Europe from its violent nature, not to extend that violence.

The uses of Anglo-Saxon manuscripts, c. 1066-1200

By focusing on the most common types of use evident in the manuscripts, it explores how readers actually interacted with books. It also treats manuscripts as cultural artefacts through which it is possible to observe the literary and social consequences of the Conquest.

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