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Archives for July 2009

When did Islamic science die (and who cares)?

When did Islamic science die (and who cares)? By Jamil Ragep Viewpoint: Newsletter of the British Society for the History of Science, No.85 (2008) Introduction: Imagine waking up one day and finding out that a Nobel Laureate has declared that the subject of your life’s work doesn’t amount to a hill of beans (or in less Bogeyesque […]

Anglo-Saxon Women Before the Law: A Student Edition of Five Old English Lawsuits

Anglo-Saxon Women Before the Law: A Student Edition of Five Old English Lawsuits By Andrew Rabin Old English Newsletter, Vol. 41.3 (2008) Introduction The status of women under Old English law is among the most contested topics in Anglo-Saxon studies. Some have argued that the years before the Norman Conquest were “a surprisingly bright period” during […]

Beowulf: Prince of the Geats, Nazis, and Odinists

Beowulf: Prince of the Geats, Nazis, and Odinists By Richard Scott Nokes Old English Newsletter, Vol. 41.3 (2008) Introduction: Beowulf, a poem written in a language identified with the Anglo-Saxons but without mention of England or a single English character, has always been entangled with the complexities of issues of nationalism. The tribes and peoples mentioned in […]

Legitimizing a low-born, regicide monarch. The case of the Mamluk sultan Baybars and the Ilkhans in the 13th century

Legitimizing a low-born, regicide monarch. The case of the Mamluk sultan Baybars and the Ilkhans in the 13th century By Denise Aigle Representing power in ancient Inner Asia : Legitimacy, transmission and the sacred, Charleux, I., Hamayon, R. and Delaplace, G. (eds), (Western Washington University, 2009) Introduction: Between the eleventh and thirteenth centuries, Syria-Palestine and Egypt were […]

Viking Denmark and Early Medieval Italy: a possibility for a comparison

I think that Viking Age in Denmark and the Early Middle Ages in Italy (more or less from 800 until 1100-1200) were both a period of experimentation, with changes in economy, society and, as a consequence, in settlement pattern.

A Medieval Worldview and its relation to Literary Authorities in a Late Medieval Pilgrimage Account

A Medieval Worldview and its relation to Literary Authorities in a Late Medieval Pilgrimage Account By Andreas Sylvest Wille Ennen Ja Nyt, Vol.4 (2004) Introduction: Travel accounts reflect a certain understanding of the world, a worldview. Around the World in Eighty days implies an understanding of the world as a globe. The dominant worldview of a given […]

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On German Knights in Denmark during the reign of Valdemar Atterdag 1340-1375

On German Knights in Denmark during the reign of Valdemar Atterdag 1340-1375 By Juha Heinänen Ennen Ja Nyt, Vol.4 (2004) Introduction: German nobility in 14th century Denmark has traditionally been viewed in nationalistic light. The influx of German nobles during the reigns of Eric Menved and Christopher II, as well as during the following period of Holsatian […]

New light on the colonisation of Nyland/Uusimaa

New light on the colonisation of Nyland/Uusimaa By Georg Haggrén & Henrik Jansson Ennen Ja Nyt, Vol.4 (2004) Introduction: Especially the late Iron Age but even the medieval period is a poorly known period in the history of the coast and archipelago of southern Finland. The archival sources are scarce and the hitherto known archaeological finds are, […]

The Electronic Medieval Age

The Electronic Medieval Age By Bo Franzén Ennen Ja Nyt, Vol.4 (2004) Abstract: This conference paper has been inspired by the fact that in recent years more and more medieval source material has been published digitally, often in database format. These electronic publications are mainly the result of converting primary or secondary sources, which have previously been […]

Varangians in Europe’s Eastern and Northern Periphery The Christianization of Northand Eastern Europe c. 950-1050 – A Plea for a Comparative Study

Varangians in Europe’s Eastern and Northern Periphery The Christianization of Northern and Eastern Europe c. 950-1050 – A Plea for a Comparative Study By John H. Lind Ennen Ja Nyt, Vol.4 (2004) Introduction: The original stimulus for this paper was the almost simultaneous reading of three project proposals that all had as a central theme the […]

Understanding peace in 13th century German culture. Were the Rhenish league and town leagues “coniurationes”?

Understanding peace in 13th century German culture. Were the Rhenish league and town leagues “coniurationes”? By Ossi Kokkonen Ennen Ja Nyt, Vol.4 (2004) Introduction: In this article I study the Rhenish league and German town leagues of the second half of the 13th century. Typically these institutions have been scrutinised from the point of view of history […]

Eighth-Century Anglo-Latin Ecclesiastical Attitudes to Dreams and Visions

Eighth-Century Anglo-Latin Ecclesiastical Attitudes to Dreams and Visions By Jesse Keskiaho Ennen Ja Nyt, Vol.4 (2004) Introduction: In Anglo-Saxon England, Christianised from the late 6th century onwards by groups of Roman, Irish and Frankish missionaries, there was a flourishing monastic culture, which exerted its own missionary influence to the Continent by the early eighth-century.  The varied origins […]

Encountering ”Otherness” in the Heimskringla

Encountering ”Otherness” in the Heimskringla By Sirpa Aalto Ennen Ja Nyt, Vol.4 (2004) Introduction: The Kings’ Sagas (konungasögur) are a genre of Icelandic sagas, which were written at the end of the 12th century and in the first half of the 13th century. This genre concentrates on telling about the kings of Norway and they can […]

Young Church in God´s New Vineyard The Motifs of Growth and Fertility in Henry´s Chronicle of Livonia

Young Church in God´s New Vineyard The Motifs of Growth and Fertility in Henry´s Chronicle of Livonia By Linda Kaljundi Ennen Ja Nyt, Vol.4 (2004) Introduction: The Chronicle of Henry of Livonia (Heinrici Chronicon Livoniae), written in about 1224-1227, is the most valuable source of information concerning the crusade to Livonia and Estonia in the early 13th […]

Ŭng Kol Pang, a 14th century Korean treatise on falconry

The earliest evidence for falconry in ancient Korea is found on a 5th-6th century AD tomb wall at Jilin Sheng.

Interview with Linda Carroll and Laura Sanguineti White

Marin Sanudo (1466-1536) is considered to be one of the most important historians of Venice.  His most important work is his Diary, which he kept from 1496 to 1533. This work consists of 58 volumes that have 40,000 pages containing an unparalleled record of life in renaissance Venice.  English readers can now access this work […]

A plague of poison: a Templar Knight mystery

A plague of poison: a Templar Knight mystery By Maureen Ash Berkley Prime Crime, 2009 ISBN: 9780425226773 With the approach of May Day and late-spring festivities, Templar Bascot de Marins, while on a sojourn at Lincoln castle, investigates a rash of murders committed by a lethal master of poisons who is creating a wave of […]

Mediaeval Colchester’s Lost Landmarks

Mediaeval Colchester’s Lost Landmarks By John Ashdown-Hill Breedon Books, 2009 ISBN: 978 1 85983 686 6 Colchester is proud of being the ‘Britain’s oldest recorded town’. Its Roman past is well publicised, and so too is its more recent history. However, until now medieval Colchester had been sadly neglected. Using a mixture of medieval documentary […]

Cita Excelentissima: Selections from the Renaissance Diary of Marin Sanudo

Cità Excelentissima: Selections from the Renaissance Diary of Marin Sanudo Edited by Patricia H. Labalme and Laura Sanguineti White; Translated by Linda L. Carroll The John Hopkins University Press, 2008 ISBN: 9780801887659 When Venice was both a center of Renaissance culture and a gathering place for news from around the world, Marin Sanudo tried to […]

The Written World: Past and Place in the Work of Orderic Vitalis

The Written World: Past and Place in the Work of Orderic Vitalis By Amanda Jane Hingst University of Notre Dame Press, 2009 ISBN: 978-0-268-03086-5 The Anglo-Norman monk Orderic Vitalis (1075-c.1142) wrote his monumental, highly individual Historia Ecclesiastica as an exercise in monastic discipline intended to preserve the events and character of Christendom for future generations. […]

Castleford’s Lost Chronicle: The Historic Imagination in Yorkshire

The Chronicle by Thomas of Castleford, which was written in the fourteenth century in the Middle English vernacular, provides an intersting complement to other vernacular chronicles of the same time.

Saving the Appearances: Chaucer’s ‘Purse’ and the Fabrication of the Lancastrian Claim

Saving the Appearances: Chaucer’s ‘Purse’ and the Fabrication of the Lancastrian Claim By Paul Strohm Chapter 4 of Hochon’s Arrow: The Social Imagination of Fourteenth-Century Texts (Princeton University Press, 1992) Introduction: The aura of inevitability still surrounding Henry IV’s seizure of the throne in 1399 results in part from our own lingering captivation by the […]

Merchant Banking in the Medieval and Early Modern Economy

This paper describes the evolution of merchant banks – merchants who specialized in remittance and credit.

GRETTISFÆRSLA: THE HANDING ON OF GRETTIR

GRETTISFÆRSLA: THE HANDING ON OF GRETTIR By Kate Heslop VIKING SOCIETY FOR NORTHERN RESEARCH, Saga-Book Vol. XXX (2006) Abstract The old Icelandic poem Grettisfærsla (‘The Handing on of Grettir’), a composition of approximately 400 lines centred around a figure named Grettir, is mentioned in chapter 52 of Grettis saga (Gr). The sole surviving text of the poem […]

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