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Archives for May 2009

Stylistic Variation and Roman Influence in the Bayeux Tapestry

There are a number of places in the Tapestry where the graphics of the main register are different in both subject matter and style. The men pictured at these points are workers, engaged in practical, mundane (distinctly non-heroic) tasks.

The Bayeux Tapestry and the Vikings

How did the Bayeux Tapestry, with its images of Normans and Englishmen, come to be so strongly equated with the legendary Vikings in the popular imagination?

Personal Equipment and Fighting Techniques Among the Anglo-Saxon Population in Northern Europe During the Early Middle Ages

The Anglo-Saxon military equipment included a sword or axe, a lance and a buckler, whereas most men would wear a dagger hanging from their belt.

An Appeal to Rome: Anglo-Saxon Dispute Settlement, 800-810

In this paper, I argue that Anglo-Saxon dispute settlement in the early ninth century exploited Charlemagne’s title as Holy Roman Emperor. T

The Otherworld Yet Real-Time Exploits of Gregory the Great

This article examines the idea of the otherworldly in medieval experience from the perspective of Gregory the Great’s mission to the English. The paper reviews the history of travel literature in the medieval world, how Britain’s remoteness and no known history placed it into the realm of the otherworldly…

Kentigern and Gonothigernus A Scottish saint and a Gaulish bishop identified

Kentigern and Gonothigernus A Scottish saint and a Gaulish bishop identified Gough-Cooper, Henry The Heroic Age Issue 6 Spring 2003 Abstract Onomastic, documentary and archaeological evidence is examined to test the proposed identification of St Kentigern of Glasgow with Gonothigernus, bishop of Senlis c.549×573. Some time ago, John Morris proposed identifying Gonothigernus, a 6th century […]

Saint Gildas and the Pestilent Dragon: A Meander through the Sixth-Century Landscape With a Most Notable Guru

The historical value of the pilgrimage episode in the Life of Gildas by the Monk of Ruys is defended by advancing solutions to the problems of composition-dating, integrity of tradition, motivation, and the appearance of a dragon. An approach is taken to delimiting the date of the pilgrimage in light of the Yellow Death pandemic and the geopolitics of the contemporary Mediterranean world.

Adomnán, Iona, and the Life of St. Columba: Their Place Among Continental Saints

Adomnán, Iona, and the Life of St. Columba: Their Place Among Continental Saints Wetherill, Jeffrey The Heroic Age Issue 6 Spring 2003 Abstract If we are to believe Adomnán, ninth abbot of Iona and author of the Life of St. Columba, the reputation of the Saint reached beyond Ireland and Britain to “Spain and Gaul […]

Oswald and the Irish

Oswald and the Irish Ziegler, Michelle The Heroic Age Issue 4 Winter 2001 Abstract To understand King Oswald of Bernicia (r. 634/5-642), it is vital to understand his relationship with the Irish kingdom of Dalriada, which in his lifetime straddled the Irish Sea with territory in Ireland and Scotland. Ramifications of Oswald’s exile in Dalriada […]

The Anglo-British Cemetery at Bamburgh An E-Interview with Graeme Young of the Bamburgh Castle Research Project

The Anglo-British Cemetery at Bamburgh An E-Interview with Graeme Young of the Bamburgh Castle Research Project Ziegler, Michelle The Heroic Age Issue 4 Winter 2001 Abstract The ultimate age of the settlement at Bamburgh is unknown. Documentary sources tell us that it was originally a British settlement later conquered by the Angles. According to the […]

Saxon Bishop and Celtic King: Interactions between Aldhelm of Wessex and Geraint of Dumnonia

Saxon Bishop and Celtic King: Interactions between Aldhelm of Wessex and Geraint of Dumnonia Grimmer, Martin The Heroic Age Issue 4 Winter 2001 Abstract This paper explores the nature of relations between Aldhelm, abbot of Malmesbury and bishop of Sherborne in Wessex, and Geraint, king of Dumnonia, and the subsequent implications for Anglo-Celtic religious and […]

Post-Severan Cramond: A Late Roman and Early Historic British and Anglo-Saxon Religious Centre?

Post-Severan Cramond: A Late Roman and Early Historic British and Anglo-Saxon Religious Centre? Cessford, Craig The Heroic Age Issue 4 Winter 2001 Abstract The evidence for occupation at the Roman fort site of Cramond between the fourth and tenth centuries A.D. is assessed using a variety of sources of evidence including artefacts, place-names, documents and […]

Redundant Ethnogenesis in Beowulf

Redundant Ethnogenesis in Beowulf Davis, Craig R. The Heroic Age Issue 5 Summer/Autumn 2001 Abstract One of the Beowulf poet’s purposes is to inspire a sense of common identity in an ethnically complex audience by reimagining relations between various hero-peoples of a traditional past with whom members of that audience might have identified. However, the […]

Gæst, gender, and kin in Beowulf: Consumption of the Boundaries

Gæst, gender, and kin in Beowulf: Consumption of the Boundaries Anderson, Carolyn The Heroic Age Issue 5 Summer/Autumn 2001 Abstract Grendel’s Mother’s masculinity is connected with the textual anxiety over kinslaughter in Beowulf. Grendel’s Mother enacts the physical threat between hosts and guests, which itself recalls the ever present violence between men and the closest […]

Hwanan sio fæhð aras: Defining the Feud in Beowulf

Hwanan sio fæhð aras: Defining the Feud in Beowulf Day, David The Heroic Age Issue 5 Summer/Autumn 2001 Abstract The Beowulf poet’s use of the term fæhð or feud differs from that of modern anthropologists-the poet uses the term to define any ongoing violent intra or inter social conflict, lending it irony and tragedy. There […]

The Social Centrality of Women in Beowulf: A New Context

This paper examines the roles of the women in Beowulf, focusing on those of hostess, peaceweavers, and monsters. When read through an anthropological lens, Beowulf presents the female characters as being central both in the story itself and in the society presented in the poem.

Art and reform in tenth-century Rome – the paintings of S. Maria in Pallara

The medieval wall paintings of the church of S. Maria in Pallara, situated on the Palatine Hill, Rome, provide insight into the intellectual use of images in the Middle Ages. The fragmentary apse programme survives, supplemented by antiquarian drawings that include copies of lost nave cycles and a lost donor portrait of their patron, Petrus Medicus.

An Education in the Mead-Hall : Beowulf’s Lessons for Young Warriors

This essay explores how Beowulf may have indoctrinated the young warriors hearing the tale. The poem prompts the geoguð (young warriors) to consider how they would respond in psychologically threatening situations, and it presents as their model Beowulf, who faces each risk bravely and is justly rewarded.

“The Wealth They Left Us”: Two Women Author Themselves through Others’ Lives in Beowulf

“The Wealth They Left Us”: Two Women Author Themselves through Others’ Lives in Beowulf Osborn, Marijane The Heroic Age Issue 5 Summer/Autumn 2001 Abstract This essay proposes the idea, based on narrative genres identified both by native tellers of tales and anthropologists, that the Beowulf poet imagines the queens Wealhtheow and Hygd as “consciously” using […]

Wicked Queens and Cousin Strategies in Beowulf and Elsewhere

This essay sets the ‘Modthrytho Episode’ of Beowulf in the context of historical and legendary ‘wicked queens’ in Anglo-Saxon England

Beowulf and the Wills: Traces of Totemism?

Beowulf and the Wills: Traces of Totemism? Glosecki, Stephen O. The Heroic Age Issue 5 Summer/Autumn 2001 Abstract This paper accounts for the prominence of the avunculate (the mother’s brother-sister’s son relationship) in Beowulf and other OE sources. Commentary from 1861 to the present is examined in order to establish that the avunculate does indeed […]

The chalice and the cup : the changing role of wine in the High Middle Ages

In an interdisciplinary approach, this study integrates the historiographies of viticulture as well as of the Christian liturgy to answer the question: why did wine disappear from the Eucharist in the high Middle Ages?

The journal of Roberto da Sanseverino (1417-1487) : a study on navigation and seafaring in the fifteenth century

Roberto da Sanseverino went on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land in 1458. He travelled from Venice to Jaffa on a galley and made his return, from Acre to Ancona, on a three-masted sailing ship.

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